Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Are you addicted to, err, cookies?

October 4, 2017

Sounds like a “dog ate homework” excuse, but you may eat too many cookies – not because you’re a fundamentally bad person – but, because you’re addicted to them andmay want to enroll in Cookies Anonymous.

In some ground-breaking research to be present at a Society for Neuroscience conference next month,  a Connecticut College study concluded that Oreos are just as addictive as drugs.

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Here’s the skinny on the research findings …

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Oh no, last week it was Oreos, today it’s pizza …

October 28, 2015

Yesterday we posted about a study concluding that Oreos are addicting.

Not to be out-done , a study by University of Michigan researchers — published in the U.S. National Library of Medicine — concludes that pizza is at the top of the most addictive food list.

cheese pizza

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So, scientifically speaking, what is it that makes pizza so addictive?

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Are you addicted to, err, cookies?

October 22, 2015

Sounds like a “dog ate homework” excuse, but you may eat too many cookies – not because you’re a fundamentally bad person – but, because you’re addicted to them andmay want to enroll in Cookies Anonymous.

In some ground-breaking research to be present at a Society for Neuroscience conference next month,  a Connecticut College study concluded that Oreos are just as addictive as drugs.

image

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Here’s the skinny on the research findings …

(more…)

Uh oh: More evidence that “scientific” research is flawed …

September 4, 2015

In a prior post, we reported that Dr. John Ioannidis, a director of Stanford University’s Meta-Research Innovation Center, estimated that about half of published results across medicine were inflated or wrong

For details, see Uh-oh: Most published research findings are false…

Now, the NY Times is reporting findings published in the Journal of Science which concludes that more than half of all studies published in the 3 most prominent psychology journals are seriously flawed and that their results can’t be replicated.

The Times says:

The report appears at a time when the number of retractions of published papers is rising sharply in a wide variety of disciplines.

Scientists have pointed to a hypercompetitive culture across science that favors novel, sexy results and provides little incentive for researchers to replicate the findings of others, or for journals to publish studies that fail to find a splashy result.

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Here’s the basis for the conclusion that the majority of the studies reported flawed conclusions …

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