Archive for the ‘Immigration’ Category

Why are tech companies hyperventilating over Trump’s travel ban?

February 9, 2017

Are they drawing that much intellectual capital and talent from Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen?

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According to ABC News: “Silicon Valley’s biggest companies are taking a strong stand against President Donald Trump’s travel ban, saying high tech needs immigrants’ creativity and energy to stay competitive.”

“About 58 percent of the engineers and other high-skill employees in Silicon Valley were born outside the U.S.”

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OK, I get that tech companies need foreign talent …

But, silly me, I thought they were coming from places like India, China, Russia, Korea.

Nope.

We’re talking about some of the science centers of the world: Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen.

Really?

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All of which begs another question.

Are the schools and technical training that much better in Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen than they are in the U.S.?

If that’s the case, why aren’t the tech companies ‘all in’ to fixing the American education system.

Strikes me that would be a better use of tech company time & money than rallying to keep a constant flow coming from 7 Obama-identified terrorist hotspots.

This one really baffles me.

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Reuters: Plurality favors the travel ban …

February 1, 2017

But, you have to read beneath the headline !

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Reuters issued one of the 1st polls on attitudes towards Trump’s travel ban on people from President Obama’s list of 7 terrorist hotspots: Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen.

The headline:

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Of course, we hate to get picky, but if you add together “make you safer” and “keep you safe”, the headline would read “majority think travel plan keeps America safe (or safer)”

But, that doesn’t fit the narrative, I guess.

Here’s the bigger story (that should have been in the headline).

(more…)

Flashback: Trump’s appeal among the “precariat”…

November 10, 2016

And, there are over 100 million of them.

Originally posted March 1, 2016

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From a very interesting election analysis in the Orange County Register by Joel Kotkin – Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University …

Disclaimer: I’m not a Trump fan because of his incivility (bad role model for kids), unpredictability (I have no idea where he really stands on any issue except “the wall” – and I’m betting the under on that one), and temperament (though I wonder why the U.S. should be the only country that doesn’t have a wild man with their finger on the nuclear button – why not round out the roster?).

That said, I’ll fill in his circle on the scantron ballot if it’s Trump vs. Hillary in Novemeber.

Why?

I have much sympathy for his constituency of victims: lower and middle class working class folks … with emphasis on “working”.

You know,  the folks that the press likes to brutally characterize as “brain dead, mindless zombies”.

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In his article, Mr. Kotkin more charitably coins them as the “precariat” — people who are working, many part time or on short-term gigs, but lacking long-term security.

(more…)

Trump’s appeal among the “precariat”…

March 18, 2016

From a very interesting election analysis in the Orange County Register by Joel Kotkin – Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University …

Disclaimer: I’m not a Trump fan because of his incivility (bad role model for kids), unpredictability (I have no idea where he really stands on any issue except “the wall” – and I’m betting the under on that one), and temperament (though I wonder why the U.S. should be the only country that doesn’t have a wild man with their finger on the nuclear button – why not round out the roster?).

That said, I’ll fill in his circle on the scantron ballot if it’s Trump vs. Hillary in Novemeber.

Why?

I have much sympathy for his constituency of victims: lower and middle class working class folks … with emphasis on “working”.

You know,  the folks that the press likes to brutally characterize as “brain dead, mindless zombies”.

clip_image002

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In his article, Mr. Kotkin more charitably coins them as the “precariat” — people who are working, many part time or on short-term gigs, but lacking long-term security.

(more…)

Trump’s appeal among the “precariat”…

March 1, 2016

From a very interesting election analysis in the Orange County Register by Joel Kotkin – Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University …

Disclaimer: I’m not a Trump fan because of his incivility (bad role model for kids), unpredictability (I have no idea where he really stands on any issue except “the wall” – and I’m betting the under on that one), and temperament (though I wonder why the U.S. should be the only country that doesn’t have a wild man with their finger on the nuclear button – why not round out the roster?).

That said, I’ll fill in his circle on the scantron ballot if it’s Trump vs. Hillary in Novemeber.

Why?

I have much sympathy for his constituency of victims: lower and middle class working class folks … with emphasis on “working”.

You know,  the folks that the press likes to brutally characterize as “brain dead, mindless zombies”.

clip_image002

=======

In his article, Mr. Kotkin more charitably coins them as the “precariat” — people who are working, many part time or on short-term gigs, but lacking long-term security.

(more…)

New study: Don’t blame the immigrants.

October 30, 2012

Punch line: While many poor immigrants from Latin America have been leaving the United States because of an inability to find decent jobs,

American workers might want them back.

This is because new studies have found that immigrants have a positive impact on the economy in the long run.

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Excerpted from New York Times Economix’ blog’s, “Immigration and American Jobs”

immigrant_workers

Of all the economic dynamics buffeting the American middle class, immigration might seem the easiest to explain: as millions of poor immigrants from Latin America poured illegally into the country … they displaced American Workers from their jobs and undercut their wages.

But this typical explanation of the impact of immigration is mostly wrong.

The most recent empirical studies conclude that the impact is slight … they suggest that immigrants have had, at most, a small negative impact on the wages of Americans who compete with them most directly.

Meanwhile, the research has found that immigrants … have a big positive impact on the economy over the long run, bolstering the profitability of American firms, reducing the prices of some products and services … and creating more opportunities for investment and jobs.

Those nostalgic for strawberry fields harvested by well-paid Americans ignore the fact that without the cheap foreign labor, there might not be American strawberry fields.

Edit by JDC

 

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Feds’ spotlight shifts from tanning salons to Chipotle …

August 18, 2011

According to the WSJ

After an immigration audit of its payrolls, burrito chain Chipotle Mexican Grill lost 450 of its roughly 1,200 employees in Minnesota.

Now it’s dealing with the aftermath— rising turnover – as workers concerned about their documents might have decided to seek employment elsewhere — and grumbling customers because of slower service from new employees.

When you went in there before … the quality was great,” says  a longtime Chipotle fan in Minneapolis.

“Now it takes forever. People are slopping stuff together.”

Other areas being targeted by audits include Virginia and Washington, D.C.

“It is very troubling for us to lose so many great employees,” said a company spokesman.

Ken’s Take: “Slopping stuff together”?  Isn’t a burrito – by definition – stuff that’s slopped together?

Lighten up, dude …

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Follow-up: Why are there more U.S. troops on South Korea’s border than on our own border?

June 29, 2011

Yesterday, I posed the question:

Why are there more U.S. troops on South Korea’s border than on our own border?

Specifically, there are about 200 US soldiers per border mile between North & South Korea, but only  is about 1 agent or soldier for every 10 miles along the US-Mexican border.

A loyal HomaFiles reader provided an thoughtful answer to my question.

Well this one is pretty easy actually: We are defending against a greater economic threat to the U.S. in South Korea than we currently face in most of the area adjacent to the Mexican border. To wit:

1) North Korea has the world’s largest artillery force, some 13,000 pieces of which are deployed at the DMZ

2) The Korean People’s Army (aka the bad guys) has ~1.1 MM soldiers (plus a reserve of 8 MM) with 70% of that active force within 100km of the DMZ

3) Seoul, South Korea is just 50 from the DMZ and produces ~$210 billion in GDP (Hong Kong is ~$225 billion)

4) Any enduring attack on Seoul would create global supply-chain chaos – much of which would disproportionately impact the U.S. and its allies

5) The most effective deterrent known to the world are U.S. men and women in uniform alert, aware, and armed to the teeth

Draw your own conclusion …

Why are there more U.S. troops on South Korea’s border than on our own border?

June 28, 2011

Excellent question posed by CNN’s Jack Cafferty:

There are 1,200 National Guard troops deployed along the U.S. border with Mexico.

The troops were scheduled to leave June 30th, but an extension is likely.

To be fair, there are about 20,000 border agents also on patrol along the 2,000 mile long U.S.-Mexican border.

That’s about 1 agent or soldier every 10 miles.

In comparison, there are 28,000 U.S.  troops stationed along the South Korean border with North Korea.

The border between North & South Korea is only about 150 miles.

So, there are almost 200 U.S. soldiers per border mile in North Korea.

And, that’s not counting the highly regarded South Korean army.

Does that make sense to you ?

Hmmm …

Stop right there, professor … proof of citizenship, please !

June 10, 2011

I was cross-haired by two relatively hot political issues last week: voter IDs and proof of legal citizenship.

I was suspected of crossing a border to illegally access government-provided services.

Yes, your mild mannered (usually) man of the classroom … stood up on suspicion of unlawful conduct.

An intimidating officer of the state demanded to see an ID and proof of citizenship.

Really !

OK, it wasn’t the U.S.- Mexico border … it was the Maryland-Virginia border.

The services that I was allegedly attempting to use illegally: use of the “Anne Arundel County landfill and recycling center” (a.k.a. the local dump).

That’s right.  In order to throw a mattress and springs into the landfill dumpster, I had to show my driver’s license and to produce proof of Anne Arundel County, Maryland residency.  Fortunately, I may be the only person in Maryland driving around with paid real estate tax bills in my glove compartment.

Think about it.

Maryland is a state that – for example – reportedly looks the other way when it comes to admitting illegal immigrants into public schools and allows them to pay in-state tuitions at colleges.  No harm, no foul.

But, the line gets drawn in the sand at the local dump.

I didn’t really mind showing my ID docs, but the situation certainly did make me scratch my head …

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Stop right there, professor … proof of citizenship, please !

June 16, 2010

Now it’s personal …

I was suspected of crossing a border to illegally access government-provided services.

Yes, your mild mannered (usually) man of the classroom … suspected of unlawful conduct.

So, an intimidating officer of the state demanded to see an ID and proof of citizenship.

Really !

OK, it wasn’t the U.S.- Mexico border … it was the Maryland-Virginia border.

The services that I was allegedly attempting to use illegally: use of the “Anne Arundel County landfill and recycling center” (a.k.a. the local dump).

That’s right.  In order to throw a couple of big cardboard boxes into the recycling grinder, I had to show my driver’s license and to produce proof of Anne Arundel County, Maryland residency.  Fortunately, I may be the only person driving around with paid real estate tax bills in my glove compartment.

Think about it.

Maryland is a state that – for example – reportedly looks the other way when it comes to admitting illegal immigrants into public schools and allows them to pay in-state tuitions at colleges.  No harm, no foul.

But, the line gets drawn in the sand at the local dump.

I didn’t mind showing my ID docs, but the situation certainly did make me scratch my head …

Hey you – vacationer – show me your papers !

June 8, 2010

Here’s a twist of irony on the Arizona illegal immigration dust-up …

My son and daughter-in-law recently took advantage of some bargain travel rates and vacationed in Mexico.

When their flight arrived back in DC, they had to:

1) Fill out a form stating their citizenship and declaring whether they were carrying stashes of livestock, yucca plants or pesos.

2) Present their passports to customs agents

3) Answer a couple of clarifying questions (e.g. purpose of trip) after their passports’ bar codes were scanned to pull up their profiles from the Fed data base.

Hmmm.

Two lifelong American citizens flying back from a Mexican vacation into a city that’s several hundred miles away from the Mexican border … a city that’s not reputed to be high on the illegal immigration standings.  They have to jump thru hoops to re-enter the country.

But if – instead of a direct flight from Cancun to DC – they had come by truck across the Rio Grande, there would have been public outrage if they were asked to show an ID.

Is it just me, or is that nuts ?

“Madam, we’ve already identified what you are, we’re just haggling over the price”

May 26, 2010

As a result of the Arizona dust-up …

Senators Kyl and McCain proposed a ‘shore up the borders’ plan that called for deploying 6,000 National Guard troops to the U.S.- Mexico border.

President Obama was reportedly non-responsive to the request during a meeting with the Senators, then immediately after the meeting, his office issued a press release saying 1,200 NG troops would be deployed to border patrol.

I know Rahm & Axelrod are brilliant politicians, but I don’t get it.

By committing any NG troops, President Obama is conceding that AZ is right and border security is an issue.

If he had deployed 6,000 troops he could have said “OK, I gave you what you wanted on border security … now let’s move on to comprehensive reform.”

Why didn’t he? 

Couldn’t be the money since spending is never an issue …

Reminds me of the old W.C. Fields joke: “Madam, we’ve already identified what you are, we’re just haggling over the price.”

Maybe Arizona should just adopt Mexico’s immigration laws …

May 24, 2010

Those who have read the Arizona law (i.e. not Holder, Napolitano, et. al.) are pointing out that:

(1) The law simply provides an enforcement mechanism for established U.S. Federal law – no new restrictions are added

(2) Racial profiling is explicitly banned in the AZ law – but not in Federal immigration laws

(3) According to Pres Calderon himself, the AZ law is way softer than Mexican immigration laws (transcript below)

So, why all the fuss ?

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New York Post: The Mexico model, May 23, 2010

Mexican President Felipe Calderon repeatedly teed off on the new Arizona law that makes illegal immigration a state crime and requires aliens to show documentation should a cop request it. 

Calderon moaned that many immigrants “still live in the shadows, and at times, like in Arizona, face discrimination.”

He said the law “introduces a terrible idea using racial profiling as a basis for law enforcement.”

Then he went on CNN.

Asked Wolf Blitzer: “If people want to come [into Mexico] from Guatemala or Honduras or El Salvador or Nicaragua, they can just walk in?”

No,” responded Calderon. “They need to fulfill a form. They need to establish their right name. We analyze if they [don’t have] a criminal [record].”

Do Mexican police go around asking for papers of people they suspect are illegal immigrants?” asked Blitzer.

Of course,” said Calderon.

“If somebody sneaks in from Nicaragua or some other country in Central America,” continued Blitzer, “they wind up in Mexico, they can go get a job?

No, no,” Calderon replied. “If somebody [does] that without permission, we send back — we send them back.”

Full article:
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/editorials/the_mexico_model_2DyxJuFroueHqDGXMzB04K

AG Holder: “It’s unconstitutional … No, I haven’t had a chance to read it”

May 17, 2010

Talk about shooting first and aiming later.

AG Eric Holder has made cameos on new shows warning that the Arizona law enforcing U.S. immigration laws could lead to racial profiling, might prompt Latinos to stop cooperating with police, and might be unconstitutional — all “on the basis of things that (he has) been able to glean by reading newspaper accounts, obviously, television”.

When asked by Rep. Poe of Texas if he had read the 10 page bill, Holder admitted “I have not had a chance to — I’ve glanced at it – I have not read it”.

Note: the entire bill is only 10 pages long.

Below is the video and a transcript.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rH1FEcbi4A

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REP. TED POE:  So Arizona, since the federal government fails to secure the border, desperately passed laws to protect its own people. The law is supported by 70 percent of the people in Arizona, 60 percent of all Americans and 50 percent of all Hispanics, according to The Wall Street Journal/NBC poll done just this week. And I understand that you may file a lawsuit against the law. It seems to me the administration ought to be enforcing border security and immigration laws and not challenge them and that the administration is on the wrong side of the American people. Have you read the Arizona law?

ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER: I have not had a chance to — I’ve glanced at it. I have not read it.

POE: It’s 10 pages. It’s a lot shorter than the health care bill, which was 2,000 pages long. I’ll give you my copy of it, if you would like to — to have a copy.

Are you going to read the law?

HOLDER: I’m sure I will read the law  … I’ll spend a good evening reading that law.

POE: Well, I’ve gone through it. And it’s pretty simple. It takes the federal law and makes it — enacts it in a state statute, although makes it much more refined in that it actually says in one of the sections that no state or subdivision may consider race, color, national origin in implementing the requirements of any subsection of this law.

It seems to outlaw racial profiling in the law. I know there’s been a lot of media hype about the — the legislation.

You have some concerns about the statute. And it’s — it’s hard for me to understand how you would have concerns about something being unconstitutional if you hadn’t even read the law.

HOLDER: Well, what I’ve said is that I’ve not made up my mind. I’ve only made — made the comments that I’ve made on the basis of things that I’ve been able to glean by reading newspaper accounts, obviously, television, talking to people

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Full transcript:
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/05/14/transcript-holder-hot-seat-arizona-immigration-law/