Archive for the ‘Creativity’ Category

I do my best thinking when I’m sleeping … say, what?

May 4, 2017

Discussing creativity in class, I casually mentioned that I seem to do my best thinking when I’m asleep.

Specifically, I reported that I like to get to work as soon as I jump out of bed (literally) … and that I often find myself doing a brain dump of thoughts that weren’t top of mind before I’d gone nite-nite.

The revelation initially got some chuckles … then some folks started nodding and chiming in with “me, too” variants on the story.

Of course, some remained unconvinced.

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For the skeptics, here some science …

(more…)

I do my best thinking when I’m sleeping … say, what?

November 30, 2016

Discussing creativity in class, I casually mentioned that I seem to do my best thinking when I’m asleep.

Specifically, I reported that I like to get to work as soon as I jump out of bed (literally) … and that I often find myself doing a brain dump of thoughts that weren’t top of mind before I’d gone nite-nite.

The revelation initially got some chuckles … then some folks started nodding and chiming in with “me, too” variants on the story.

Of course, some remained unconvinced.

clip_image002

=======

For the skeptics, here some science …

(more…)

I do my best thinking when I’m sleeping … say, what?

September 30, 2016

Discussing creativity in class, I casually mentioned that I seem to do my best thinking when I’m asleep.

Specifically, I reported that I like to get to work as soon as I jump out of bed (literally) … and that I often find myself doing a brain dump of thoughts that weren’t top of mind before I’d gone nite-nite.

The revelation initially got some chuckles … then some folks started nodding and chiming in with “me, too” variants on the story.

Of course, some remained unconvinced.

clip_image002

=======

For the skeptics, here some science …

(more…)

To spur innovation, hire people who agitate you …

September 10, 2012

Punch line: Nearly 66% of companies on the Fortune 100 list in 1990 are not on the list today.

Why?

It is largely because they didn’t innovate and open themselves up to their next market.

* * * * *

Excerpted from Fast Company, “Why Hiring People Who Annoy You Helps You Innovate”

So are there ways for large, established companies to innovate?

Yes and here are some unconventional guidelines to follow.

1. Hire people who annoy you:

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A lot of research shows that diverse teams tend to come up with a wider variety of answers, and, thus, are more likely to find the surprising winning idea.

This suggests a hiring strategy–hire people who annoy you.

As long as you’re ensuring they are smart, the people who annoy you represent the diversity you and your company require.

2. Don’t copy, remake:

There is an entire cottage industry devoted to teaching you how to be innovative.

Most answers are glib because they point to some surface feature of a behavior.

3. Don’t create, listen:

The purpose of innovation is not simply to build something new, but to win new customers, new markets, or new products …

If you want to find out what customers want, nix the focus groups and instead watch their behavior.

Edited by JDC
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Are you living up to your creative potential? … That’s OK, nobody is.

May 3, 2012

Excerpt from AdAge: “Global Study: 75% of People Think They’re Not Living Up to Creative Potential”

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More than 75% of people feel that their countries are not living up to their collective potential to be creative.

In the U.S., 52% of respondents described themselves as creative, the highest of all the regions. It was 36% in France and 19% in Japan.

Japan rose to the top as the most creative country, but Japanese respondents themselves didn’t view Japan as the most creative.

Six in 10 people felt that being creative is valuable to their country’s economy, while in the U.S. it was 7 in 10. France was the country with the lowest number of people prizing creativity — 13%.

Indeed, increasing pressure to be productive rather than creative at work in the U.S. and U.K. was 80%, while 85% in France.

Edited by ARK

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