Baltimore Fix: How about more Jesuit high schools?

Yesterday, we looked at the numbers re: Baltimore City school’s spending …

Summary: Over $16,000 per student …  top 4 (or higher, depending on the study) in the country … with a  student to teacher ratio of about 15 to 1 … and a student to “adult” ratio of about 8 to 1.

Not bad.

While researching the post, I stumbled on an article in Business Insider:

How a Baltimore school that only accepts poor students has a 100% college acceptance rate.

The article profiles Baltimore’s Cristo Rey High School  which has achieved a 100% college acceptance rate among graduates despite taking only students from disadvantaged neighborhoods

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How does Cristo Rey do it?

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Well, for openers it’s a Jesuit high school.

You know, Jesuit as in Georgetown University (and, as in Pope Francis).

The school is funded almost entirely by corporate and private donors.

It has to be since you can’t have the government funding non-secular heresy like religious-based schools.

The school is selective.

“Only the most motivated students get accepted. They’re involved in several school clubs and organizations and can already tell school administrators exactly what they want to do after graduation.“

The main criteria?

Students must  have at least one parent, grandparent, guardian “invested” in their education.

The proof?

The invested adult gets gets interviewed and has to substantiate their commitment.

What?

I thought teachers were supposed to surrogate for absentee dads and disinterested relatives.

“Students are all given after-school jobs as a prerequisite for attending, which keeps them occupied and introduces them to the workplace at a younger age.”

That’s one of the main limiters since the school struggles to find enough job openings for its students.

And, oh yeah, what about the cost?

About $14,000 per student … roughly 15% less than Baltimore City Schools.

Go Jesuits!

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